Quick & Easy Wood Floor Repair

By Scott Sidler August 22, 2016

wood floor repairI’ve written about how to replace damaged individual floor boards previously in Invisible Repairs For Hardwood Floors, but sometimes you just need a quick wood floor repair for little problem spots.

This type of repair doesn’t require any carpentry skills and takes only about 10 minutes to fill in soft spots or missing chunks of wood. You don’t have to remove whole boards and make a big mess either.

With the tutorial in this post you can repair small areas of damage with just a chisel and some wood filler. So, when you have a small section of wood flooring that is damaged, but not badly enough to justify the work of replacing the whole board, that is the perfect wood floor repair for you.

 

 

Step #1 Dig Out the Damage

Using a chisel or awl dig out the soft or damaged wood until you get to sound strong wood. It doesn’t have to be a clean squared off patch. In fact, it works best if the area is a more random shape. So, let the wood guide you as to how much or little needs to be removed.

 

 

Step #2 Tape Around the Patch

We’ll be filing the hole with epoxy so you want to have the area taped off right to the edge to make sure the area around your patch isn’t affected. Blue painter’s tape works best. Don’t use anything stronger because you may pull off the surrounding finish on the floors.

 

 

Step 3 Fill with Epoxy
Fill with Epoxy

Step #3 Fill with Epoxy

For most of these repairs I use Abatron WoodEpox, but KwikWood is another good option for the smaller areas. If you aren’t familiar with how to mix up and apply WoodEpox check out Wood Repair with Abatron Epoxy  for the specific instructions. You can also use other wood fillers if you prefer, but I have found these two to be the most effective.

You want to really press the epoxy or filler down into the patch to fill all the voids. Also, make sure to overfill the patch just a bit so that you can sand it smooth and even with the surrounding area once cured.

One you have the patch filled the way you want pull off the tape to reveal nice clean edges.

 

 

Stained wood floor repair
Sand & Stain

Step #4 Sand & Stain

Once the epoxy is cured and has hardened remove the tape and sand the patch smooth and level with the remaining floor boards. Do your best to not sand the finish on the floor boards but only the epoxy. If you sand the finish off the surrounding boards it will be difficult to blend everything in and will make more work for you later.

Clean up any dust and wipe the area down with some mineral spirits. Now mix up some wood stain that is closest to the color of your existing floor and wipe it onto the patch. Wipe off any excess and let it dry for a few minutes.

 

 

draw in wood grain
Drawing in the Grain

Step #5 Draw the Grain

Sometimes depending on the grain of the wood the patch can still stand out visually and may bug some people. For the pickiest among us I have a solution to help make things really disappear and blend in. It’s not necessary, but it does put the finishing touches on the patch nicely.

Using a sharpie or artist’s brush with paint do your best to draw the grain lines of the wood back into place. You can make this as complex or simple as you want. Try to follow the pattern of the existing wood like you see being done in the picture.

I usually do this before staining as well to help everything blend together a little better.

 

 

Repaired wood floor
The Finished Product

Step #6 Coat with Finish

Once everything is dry brush on a good thick coat of polyurethane onto the patch to seal and protect it. Only apply to the patch and not the surrounding boards. Make sure you match the existing sheen of your floors whether that is satin, semi-gloss or high gloss.

Let the finish dry overnight before it receives and foot traffic and you’re ready to go!

 

 

When to Use This Patch

This type of wood floor repair works best when you have just a small area that needs to be repaired and it doesn’t makes sense to replace whole boards. You save more of the historic fabric of the building and only repair the damaged spots.

It doesn’t look perfect, but it is a whole lot better than a gouged or missing chunk of flooring and a lot less invasive than board replacement. This is also a good stop gap repair to take care of problem spots until a more comprehensive restoration of the floors fits the schedule and budget.

Good luck and have fun with it!

4 thoughts on “Quick & Easy Wood Floor Repair”

  1. Scott – does the Abatron accept the stain well? I got a recommendation from a furniture repair person who recommended Sculpwood. I bought some and then talked with the manufacturer and it turns out it doesn’t take stain. Argh. Could I dig out the ugly generic plugs in my floor and put in Abatron?

    As for doing the grain lines – try using a #0, #00/(2/0), #000/(3/0) artist paint brush. These are really tiny brushes which allow you to draw fine grain lines. Takes a little longer, but well worth it. Thanks

    1. Haldis, the Abatron does accept stain well (though it’s not a perfect match) and you can also use some of their dry pigments when mixing the epoxy to get as close as possible. Good tip on the artists brushes!

  2. This is quite brilliant, thank you!
    We have some gouges out of our woodwork, thanks to my cats, and I’ve wondered for years how best to repair them. I think this would work for those areas, too.

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